Treating a cold during pregnancy

By Danielle Braff

You’re pregnant but instead of glowing, your nose is running, your head is stuffy and you can’t stop coughing.

In addition to all the other changes going on in your body during pregnancy, your immune system is also adjusting, so colds are likely, according to the American Pregnancy Association (APA).

And if you catch a cold, it’s likely that it’ll last longer than previous colds — also due to your pregnancy. But there’s also a little good news: It won’t hurt your baby.

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Toddlers and colds

By Danielle Braff

The only thing more miserable than toddlers are toddlers who have a cold.

And unfortunately, those terrible 2-year-olds always seem to catch colds because they can’t keep their chubby little fingers out of their adorable little mouths. So the entire winter season ends up being one cold after another.

In fact, in a child’s first two years, he has eight to 10 colds per year, according to HealthyChildren.org, a website powered by the American Academy of Pediatrics. This number could be even higher if the child is in day care or if he has school-age siblings.

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At what point should you go to the emergency room with the flu?

By Danielle Braff

You may feel like you’re dying when you have the flu.

But you don’t necessarily have to go to the emergency room or even to the doctor until the symptoms get severe, according to the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Each year, more than 200,000 people in the United States go to the hospital because of the flu, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Cold and flu medicines safe use tips

SOURCE: CHPA Educational Foundation, www.KnowYourOTCs.org

  • Always read the Drug Facts label carefully. The label tells you everything you need to know about the medicine, including the ingredients, what you are supposed to use it for, how much you should take, and when you should not take the medicine.
  • You should choose a multi-symptom cold medicine that matches only the symptoms you have. (See the “Uses” section of the Drug Facts label.)

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Cough facts

SOURCE: CHPA Educational Foundation, www.KnowYourOTCs.org

Did you know there are different types of coughs? To best identify and treat your cough, here’s what you need to know.

A chesty or congested cough is loose and accompanied by a buildup of mucus or phlegm in the lungs. Cough expectorants help loosen the mucus so that when you do cough, it can be more productive. There are also coughs where no mucus or phlegm is present.

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Is it too late to get a flu shot?

By Danielle Braff

If you haven’t had a flu shot, it’s not too late to get one, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

While the flu season typically peaks between December and March, it’s still going through May, the CDC says.

It takes about two weeks for the vaccine’s antibodies to start kicking in to protect you against the influenza virus, so getting the shot as early as possible is always recommended.

Even if you already had the flu this year, it isn’t too late for a shot, as you could still get a different strain of the virus.

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Scientifically proven ways to avoid the cold and the flu

By Danielle Braff

Science is on your side. Follow these proven methods to avoid getting sick this season.

Take a walk: A study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found that staying active cuts your odds of catching a cold. And even if you catch a cold, it won’t be as severe if you exercised prior to getting the cold. That’s because exercise builds up your immune system so it can fight off the bugs more efficiently, the study found.

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Sleeping when you’re sick

By Danielle Braff

When you’ve got a cold or the flu, all you want to do is to sleep through the night.

But chances are, you’re coughing, sneezing, you’ve got a headache, you may be nauseated … the list goes on and on.

There are a slew of over-the-counter nighttime medications designed specifically to help you sleep through the night when you’re sick. These include NyQuil, Tylenol Cold Multi-Symptom Nighttime, Delsym Cough Cold Nighttime and Robitussin Nighttime. Each of these will help control your symptoms, and they also will make you feel drowsy.

Check out these valuable coupons on medicines to help you get through this year’s cold and flu season.

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